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How to Make Giant Bubbles

How to make Giant Bubbles

 

If there is ever a perfect time to learn how to make giant bubbles, spring time is it!

giant bubbles

The weather is perfect, and everyone is ready to get outdoors after months of cold rain, ice, and snow. So all the Smockities have been on a quest to find the perfect recipe and the best method to make giant bubbles.

Popping giant bubbles

Here is the recipe that we found great success with.

Giant Bubbles Recipe

  • 6 cups water
  • 1 cup light corn syrup
  • 2 cups blue Dawn dish soap

1. Mix the water and corn syrup thoroughly.

2. Add dish soap slowly, and stir, trying not to make bubbles.

giant bubbles

 

We experimented with the design of the bubble wand before we settled on our final model.

Emelyn with giant bubbles

 

Here’s how we did it.

  • 2 dowels
  • 2 pieces of string (one longer than the other)
  • washer (for weighing the lower string down)

1. Tie the ends of the short string onto the ends of the 2 dowels.

2. Thread the washer onto the long string.

3. Tie the ends of the string onto the dowel near the first string.

4. Dip string into bubble solution.

giant bubbles

In this photo, you can see the washer on the bottom string is weighing it down, so no one needs to hold it as in the above pictures.

giant bubbles

We had so much fun with these easy to make giant bubbles!

Outdoor Play Challenge

 

Give them a try and check out the rest of these great outdoor activities in the Great Outdoor Play Challenge.

 

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Go to Homeschool Retreat FOR FREE! {PLUS $50 Giveaway}

Homeschool retreat giveaway

Have you heard about the phenomenal event, The Homeschool Moms’ Winter Summit? If you haven’t, you are missing out on the chance to receive a boatload of encouragement, refreshment, and renewal!

Here are some recaps of past Summits from different attendees:

And here you can see for yourself what attending The Summit looks like.

And now, for the first time ever, there is a way to attend The Summit FOR FREE! Here’s how:

  • Round up 5 friends who have never been.
  • Print off 3 of these registration forms.
  • Fill in the info for yourself and your 5 friends.
  • Collect the money and write one check to cover the registration for those 5. (YOURS IS FREE!)
  • Mail to:

Winter Summit
c/o Roxanne Parks
2612 Meadow View Road
Edmond, OK 73013

Now, you might be thinking, “I don’t have 5 homeschooling friends, but I would love to meet some like minded ladies!” We would love to have you at The Summit, and to help you get there we are offering a $10 discount code. When you register, simply apply the code “smockity10″.

AND as a special bonus, one lucky winner will receive the cost of their registration refunded in a drawing on January 1st!

Okay, who’s ready to win a $50 Amazon gift card??? Anyone can enter and there are multiple ways, so be sure to increase your chances by visiting each blogger who will be attending The Summit!

Simply leave a comment on this post to enter. Then, hop on over to the the other participating blogs to enter there, too. You will be given one entry per blog, for a maximum of 5 entries. One winner will be randomly chosen on Wednesday, December 17 to receive the $50 Amazon gift card.

See you at The Summit!

2015 web button MEET ME IN TX

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Developing Your Child’s Natural Gifts

developing child's natural talents

This is a pencil drawing my 19yo daughter did of her sister, my 4yo, Peyton.

A pencil drawing.

Honestly, I’m in awe of the gift she possesses! It isn’t something she inherited from me. It isn’t something I taught her. It isn’t something she learned from a curriculum.

It is something that was allowed to develop through hours and hours of practice and the freedom to do that whenever the inspiration struck. Whether that was 9:30 in the morning or 2:30 in the afternoon didn’t matter. Since we homeschool, studies could be postponed or rescheduled in order to focus on developing her natural gifts.

Whether your child is creative, artistic, inventive, gifted at writing, mechanically inclined, or otherwise talented, be sure to give them plenty of unstructured time and the materials they need to experiment with and develop that natural gift God has given them.

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Take Turns Reading Aloud With “Popcorn”

Have you ever watched a pot of popcorn being heated? You cannot predict which kernel will pop next, or when. This read aloud game uses that same principle.

Take turns reading aloud with popcorn

When I taught elementary grade levels in public school for 8 years, the students often took turns reading aloud. This let them practice their reading skills, and one way I encouraged the students to pay attention and keep up with where we were was to play “popcorn.”

Now that I’m a homeschool mom of 8, I use the same approach to let my own children practice those same skills. Even though I am homeschooling grades from preschool through 12th grade, we all read the Bible together every morning, and everyone, from 1st grade up, gets a turn at reading aloud with “popcorn.”

Here’s how it works:

  • Everyone looks at the passage being read, and knows where we are beginning.
  • Mom starts reading, and at a random point, stops and says “popcorn,” and calls a random name.
  • The person whose name was called must begin reading at precisely the point the former reader stopped.
  • After reading for a while, this reader stops at a random point and calls, “popcorn” to choose another reader.
  • (Optional) Stickers can be awarded for children who never lose their place.

Here’s an example of our varied ages playing “popcorn.” Each child must keep up with what is being read in case his or her name is called next.

This read aloud game has many benefits.

  • No one knows who will be called next, so each child must pay attention
  • Each child gets a chance to practice reading aloud, but can choose how long to read. This alleviates embarrassment for the slower readers.
  • There is no daydreaming during reading since everyone is on high alert in case they are called next.
  • The material read aloud is remembered since everyone is paying attention.

We take turns reading aloud with popcorn every day. My kids of all ages love it!

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Helpful Links – Homeschooling and Parenting

I frequently get emails or private messages on Facebook asking my advice on different topics I have already written on, like homeschooling and parenting.

Since I don’t have time to answer each inquiry individually, I though I would give you all a roundup of helpful links with my post popular posts on those topics.

Homeschooling

Parenting

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This One’s For Cheryl

Once a couple of years ago, I got into a semi-heated discussion on Facebook with a friend of a friend.

Cheryl, a college professor, was bemoaning the fact that homeschooled kids are just not properly educated and prepared for college.

I didn’t know Cheryl personally, but since she was stating this opinion on my friend’s page, I was able to join in on the discussion. I pointed out to Cheryl that not all homeschoolers are alike, and just like a random sampling of any group of people would be varied, there would be some studious, some serious, some awkward, some dullards, some intelligent, and so on.

Cheryl disagreed. She maintained that every homeschooled kid she had ever come across in her college classroom was ill-prepared and socially inept. (She never said whether that was one or one hundred.) She insisted this experience must represent the entire population of homeschoolers.

She claimed that homeschoolers who somehow manage to bumble through high school and actually make it to college do not know how to understand assignments, don’t have the time management skills to complete assignments or turn them in on time, and don’t have the competency to get them done in a manner worthy to be graded.

She said that homeschoolers simply could not cope with the demands of life away from their previous sheltered existence, and she predicted that homeschoolers could not do well in the “real world.”

This one’s for you, Cheryl.

Meet Madison

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